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20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
a science lesson inspired by an announcement from nasa. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: just what is dark matter? find a short video with a simple answer on today's science roundup. nasa and the european space agency are partnering to send a telescope into space to investigate dark matter and dark energy. read more about these mysterious forces and what scientists hope to find on our science page. and think you've received bad advice about social security? our benefits guru gets to the bottom of that issue in today's "ask larry" column on our business page. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll return to the immigration debate with a look at the president's plans for reform. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
much. >>> today's tweet of the day a sad reminder from nasa. the space organization tweeted this photo of the crew of the space shuttle "challenger" and wrote this, quote. the nasa family lost seven of its own on january 28th, 1986. today, 26 years later, we remember these brave men and women. what do we do when something that's hard to paint, really wants to be painted? we break out new behr ultra with stain-blocker from the home depot... ...the best selling paint and primer in one that now eliminates stains. so it paints over stained surfaces, scuffed surfaces, just about any surface. what do you say we go where no paint has gone before, and end up some place beautiful. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. behr ultra. now with advanced stain blocking, only at the home depot, and only $31.98 a gallon. we asked total strangers to watch it for us. thank you so much. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. they didn't take a dime. how much in fees does your bank take to watch your money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your
academy of science. national oceanic -- noah. nasa. the other side, heritage foundation. that is disingenuous. >> dana: we need an hour for this. >> bob: you have your scientists we got ours we have more. >> greg: no, you don't. >> bob: we, i think that we in the end the question is what do we hand off -- >> eric: your scientist funded by federal grants. >> greg: you have al gore only happy in other people's misery. he was glad to see a disaster. it meant he would have been vindicated though the disasters are not linked to global warming. though president obama thought wildfires were linked to this. >> bob: you said the oceans emit co2. according to the study i read -- guest >> greg: the oceans are warmer and create more warmth. you mention 2019 is hottest op record. that's 2% of the earth getting warmer. you have win. >> dana: i love this topic but je to go, because bob will get mad because we don't have time for his. john kerry confirmed to be the next secretary of state and will succeed hillary clinton who will be talking to greta tonight at 10:00 p.m. eastern. be sur
and microsoft is eager to open a new nasa develop a facility at our expense and loss. one of the most important parts of this legislation as i mentioned is that we are using fees from the newly expanded h-1b1 visas and green cards difference to initiative on standard this will keep america at the cutting edge of science and technology and fuel economic growth for this country and generations to come. while each of the co-authors of this legislation have a substantial contribution, i'm especially grateful to senator hatch of utah for his leadership of senator hatch, which itself a little bit more about this legislation? >> thank you, mr. koontz. >> senator from utah. >> i want to thank you, senator coons and senator klobuchar and senator rubio here as you can see, it's a real pleasure to work with these three partners. and others as well that will remain here before we're through here today. i particularly want to thank you for the overview you have given on this bill. it's been a real pleasure for me to work with you three very innovative leaders in the sena senate. but as a number of you have
left. >> brian: right. i'm just hoping that they somehow, nasa, worked out a thing to be able to talk to the monkey without moving the helmet off. >> steve: sure. they've invented so many things, tang, velcro. i'm sure they'll figure this. >> gretchen: our top story today is dangerous twisters and storms and they're tearing across the country. one person has died after a tree fell on a shed. new video showing power lines, traffic lights and trees downed, some homes destroyed. >> i built it out of poured concrete, block up or down solid with rebar and it or it all to piece. i can't imagine what could have hit it. >> gretchen: last night tornadoes tore through mississippi, missouri, and arkansas. mariano molina has been tracking the system. >> very unusual. this is more springtime weather. during the month of april, may or even into june, this is when we should be seeing some of this kind of severe weather. we've had over 200 reports of tornadoes, damaging wind gusts and large size hail. i want to show you why we're seeing this during the month of january. we're seeing extremely warm te
it -- it is real li startling. the nation nasa demand yearly for 120,000 computer science engineers, but our universities only produce 40,000 people a year. now, this is an indictment of our educational system. we need to fix that. we need to get to a point in this country where we have 120,000 people graduate being to meet the demand. but in the short-term we have to deal with the fact that of our 80,000 graduates are not creating here, those jobs are still going to exist. they are a just not going to exist here. these companies aren't going to wait for us to produce more graduates. these companies aren't going to wait for us to fix our immigration system. they have got a business to run. if they can't find the people they need to fill those jobs, they will send the jobs to another country. that means that these high-paying jobs in these industries will be paying the taxes in some other country, will be stimulating the economy in some other country, will be laying down roots in some other nation. you want know why america is special? because over 200 years we have been a magnet that attract
. gary, what are you expect a nasa governor makes its way up? >> s. moderate of these features you can expect with brian schweizer in his governorship. he can use whatever packard bell ontrack capital he has. he has a big month ahead of the work that will then come to his desk so he can do what his job is. >> is that what tonight is about, the tone and tenor is not too much due to this point, but setting a tone. a lot of it talked about in the previous three weeks since i got this session underway. >> the optimism in the last three weeks is genuine. i visited a couple times, almost quite a coincidence. i sense there's a good positive spirit always taken place there. and i think bullock thinks that it will keep that going. >> we hope you're right. preparing to deliver his state of the state address. as we said, about a 45 minute speech. of course quite a bit different. let's listen in now to governor steve bullock. >> now to present to you, the governor of the state of montana, the honorable steve bullock. [cheers and applause] [applause] [cheers and applause] >> lieutenant governor wal
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)